Archive for November, 2007

Cold Weather Tough

Friday, November 30th, 2007

Do you know what is the toughest part of handling cold weather? Getting into a little car swathed in multiple layers of warm stylish clothes, that’s what.

When I bought my Glacial Ice blue two-door Hyundai Accent, it was a perfect fit for a body under five foot three inches tall! It was designed in some far off country just for me. Picture this: dressed in tank top, shorts, sockless deck shoes, I slipped behind the wheel sucking up the beautiful spring weather in Washington state. Glorious sun warming temperature of 72 degrees. Well that ideal day is duplicated many, many days throughout the year. So I am home free. Except….

When our small blue dot goes on its annual silly ellipse around ol’ Sol the temperature drops down below the freezing mark. My honey tanned skin would turn blue if my clothes didn’t increase. So I bundle up in long pants, socks, boots, sweater, frost proof jacket, wrap my nose in a home made scarf and stuff myself behind the wheel. My scarf and coat tail get stuck in the door. Oh, bother. And the buffet luncheon to which I had special invitation does nothing to ease the tight fit.

Wear less? Run the engine for fifteen minutes to warm the car interior and dress lightly? I did that once and was tied up in a traffic jam (I don’t think cars stopped because of my costume) — I nearly got frost bite walking to safety. No. I will continue to dress for the weather, pull in my waistline and drive my appointed rounds. Do not suggest I take a bus. Although truly that would be the most sensible alternative in view of present world affairs.

Describe Garbage, please

Tuesday, November 13th, 2007

Cleaning up after a coyote tore through a garbage sack is no picnic. A disgusting mess of soft drink cartons and food containers. Garbage is not always messy – just depends on what constitutes the leftovers. That is what garbage is after all – leftovers. I like to clean up the bits of leftover peas or corn or ham after a satisfying dinner. Should those few tablespoons full be considered garbage? I do not like to think so. Some folks think over eating puts an extra burden on the digestive system and ultimately the heart. But should one think of the eater as the garbage can? Maybe that is the correct description. So to prevent the manufacture of fat cells in my body I will refrain from becoming a garbage can?

OK so I should stop cleaning up leftovers at the table. I can do that.

Truly, cleaning up ravaged garbage outdoors has some essence of romance. Imagine nature’s critters licking candy wrappers and sugary soft drink boxes in ecstasy. I know at least one coyote comes through “my” Refuge (McNary NWR, Burbank, Washington) on a regular basis because I see the footprints in the sand and the scat along the trail.

A raccoon may have been responsible for the overturned can. The can is a small one set out by a handwashing station alongside portable toilets but paper towels do not beckon sniffers. Other critters that would not resist a sweet treat are mink, skunk and weasels. I thought perhaps they would climb inside the can and ravage the food stuff inside, not tip it over and strew the wrappers around. How am I to know? I just clean up. And like *Frederick S. Perls, M.D, Ph.D, says: “Don’t push the river, just let it flow.”

* In and Out the Garbage Pail, 1969, a fun book with drawings and not a page number in sight!

Describe Garbage, please

Tuesday, November 13th, 2007

Cleaning up after a coyote tore through a garbage sack is no picnic. A disgusting mess of soft drink cartons and food containers. Garbage is not always messy – just depends on what constitutes the leftovers. That is what garbage is after all. I like to clean up the bits of leftover peas or corn or ham after a satisfying dinner. Should those few tablespoons full be considered garbage? I do not like to think so. Some folks think over eating puts an extra burden on the digestive system and ultimately the heart. But should one think of the eater as the garbage can? Maybe that is the correct description. So to prevent the manufacture of fat cells I will refrain from becoming a garbage can?

OK so I should stop cleaning up leftovers at the table.

Truly, cleaning up ravaged garbage outdoors has some essence of romance. Imagine nature’s critters licking candy wrappers and sugary soft drink boxes in ecstasy. I know at least one coyote comes through “my” Refuge (McNary NWR, Burbank, WA) on a regular basis because I see the footprints in the sand and the scat along the trail.

A raccoon may have been responsible for the overturned can. The can is a small one set out by a handwashing station alongside portable toilets but paper towels do not beckon sniffers. Other critters that would not resist a sweet treat are mink, skunk and weasels. I thought perhaps they would climb inside the can and ravage the food stuff inside, not tip it over and strew the wrappers around. How am I to know? I just clean up. And like *Frederick S. Perls, M.D, Ph.D, says: “Don’t push the river, just let it flow.”

* In and Out the Garbage Pail, 1969, a fun book with drawings and not a page number in sight!